Hugh Evelyn Prints

CLASSIC PRINTS

Officer, 1720

£4.00

I Infantry Uniforms of the British Army 1660-1790

In stock

Description

From a portrait, his regiment is not known, but it was one with green facings. He may belong to a grenadier company (but he should be wearing a grenadier’s pouch). A fusil was a weapon of honour. Perhaps he owned a good one: a good fusil was an expensive item and he may have wished to be shown with it in his portrait. His cuffs are slashed and kept in place by a gold chain hooked round a button on his sleeve. In the XVII and early XVIII centuries officers’ coats bore little resemblance to those of the men and were more like civilian clothes. It was often with difficulty that officers were induced to wear uniform. After this date officers’ dress became more uniform and after about 1750 closely resembled that of the men. The black feathers in the brim of his hat are often referred to but are not often seen in pictures. He is wearing his sash and gorget, showing he is on duty. The sash is worn over his shoulder not round the waist. The position of the sash has varied through the years: by the end of the eighteenth century it was back round the waist again; by 1900 it was over the shoulder – the left shoulder this time – and 50 years ago was back round the waist. Another unusual feature of this uniform is the waistcoat, which is far more ornate than the coat, which is rather plain. Source: Portrait of an officer.

Additional information

Dimensions 24 × 37.5 cm