Napoleon

Showing 17–26 of 26 results

  • Sale!

    Bank of England Volunteers

    £7.50

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    (The image below, the original of which hangs in The Bank of England Museum, is shown for historical interest and is not for sale)

    Presentation of the Colours to the Bank of England Volunteer Corps by the Lady of Samuel Thornton, Esq. Governor of the Bank of England on 2nd September 1799.  By Thomas Stothard (1755–1834) Bank of England Museum accession 0289. © Bank of England.
  • Sale!

    London and Westminster Light Horse

    £7.50

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    (The image below, the original of which is in the custody of the National Portrait Gallery, London, is shown for historical interest and is not for sale)

    The Light Horse Volunteers of London & Westminster, Commanded by Coll. Herries, Reviewed by His Majesty on Wimbledon Common 5th July, 1798 by Thomas Rowlandson; Custody of The National Portrait Gallery, London

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    Surrey Yeomanry

    £7.50

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    The Surrey Yeomanry was a unit of the British Army first formed as volunteer cavalry in 1794. It was reformed in 1901 and saw varied srvice in World War I. Postwar it was converted to artillery and during World War II one of its regiments distinguished itself defending the ‘Canal Line’ during the retreat to Dunkirk, later serving at Alamein, in Sicily and Italy. Its other regiment served in East Africa, the Siege of Tobruk, and in Iraq and Persia. The regiment’s lineage is maintained today by 2 (Surrey Yeomanry) Field Troop, 579 Field Squadron (EOD), part of 101 (London) Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) (Volunteers).

  • Sale!

    Deptford Cavalry

    £7.50

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    Deptford is named after a ford of the River Ravensbourne, a tributary of the River Thames in south London.  St Paul’s, Deptford, is one of London’s finest Baroque parish churches, cited as “one of the most moving C18 churches in London” in the Buildings of England series. It was designed by gentleman architect Thomas Archer and built between 1712 and 1730 in Deptford, which was then a settlement in Kent but is now part of South East London. It was one of the 50 churches that were to be built by the New Church Commissioners, although only 12 were ultimately constructed.

  • Sale!

    Westminster Cavalry

    £7.50

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    The regiment was first recruited from wealthy merchants and bankers as the London and Westminster Light Horse in 1779. It was disbanded in 1783 but in 1793 the Prime Minister, William Pitt the Younger, proposed that the English Counties form a force of Volunteer Yeoman Cavalry that could be called on by the King to defend the country against invasion or by the Lord Lieutenant to subdue any civil disorder within the country.  So the regiment was reformed again the following year.  The regiment was renamed the Westminster Volunteer Cavalry in 1797 and barracks were built to accommodate the regiment in Gray’s Inn Road in 1812.[4] The regiment was disbanded again in 1829 and the barracks were decommissioned in 1830.

  • Sale!

    Middlesex Cavalry

    £7.50

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    In 1793 the Prime Minister, William Pitt the Younger, proposed that the English Counties form a force of Volunteer Yeoman Cavalry that could be called on by the King to defend the country against invasion or by the Lord Lieutenant to subdue any civil disorder within the country.  A cavalry troop entitled the Uxbridge Volunteer Cavalry was raised by Christopher Baynes (later Sir Christopher Baynes, 1st Baronet) in 1797.  By 1798 the unit consisted of over 100 men organised in two Troops. It was once called out, in 1801 to prevent rioting. After the Treaty of Amiens in 1802 the regiment was disbanded.  F following a spate of industrial unrest and rioting, authorisation was given on 10 December 1830 to raise two new troops of Yeomanry in the Uxbridge district. It was raised as the Uxbridge Squadron of Yeomanry Cavalry with troops at Harefield and West Drayton, in 1830.

  • Sale!

    Southwark Cavalry

    £7.50

    Loyal Volunteers of London

    Southwark is the oldest part of south London. An urban area to the south of the bridge was first developed in the Roman period, but subsequently abandoned. The name Southwark dates from the establishment of a defensive position in the area by King Alfred in the 9th century. Southwark was formed in 1965 from the former area of Southwark, Camberwell, and Bermondsey.

    Southwark is recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Sudweca. The name means “southern defensive work”.  The strategic context of the defences would have been in relation to London, its bridge and preventing waterborne attackers from travelling further up the Thames. The borough borders the City of London and Tower Hamlets to the north,  Lambeth to the west and Lewisham to the east. To the south the borough tapers giving a brief border with  BromleyThe northwest part of the borough is part of Central London and is densely developed. To the east, the Rotherhithe peninsula has lower-density modern housing and open space formed around the former docks. The southern part of Southwark includes the Victorian suburbs of Camberwell, Peckham and Nunhead, and the prosperous “village” of Dulwich with some very large houses forms the far south of the borough.

  • Sale!

    Clerkenwell Cavalry

    £7.50

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    Clerkenwell is the oldest residential and business district in Islington. The area is named after the Clerks’ Well, a 12th-century water source that adjoined St Mary’s Nunnery (c 1140). Due to fa plentiful supply of fresh water, open fields and its proximity to the City, Clerkenwell was a favoured place for the building of monasteries and other institutions. These inclu

    The Parish of St James Clerkenwell Taken from ye last Survey With Corrections © The Trustees of the British Museum, released as CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

    ded the Priory of the Order of St John (1143), and Charterhouse Monastery (1370) and (later) School.

  • Sale!

    Lambeth Loyal Cavalry

    £7.50

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    The Lambeth Loyal Volunteers and the Independent Lambeth cavalry were typical of the many volunteer militia units that formed around the country in response to fears of a French invasion, and tacitly, in response to the political radicalisam that had been engendered by the French Revolution.  The Lambeth Volunteers were funded by public subscription, and their activities ceased when there was no further public enthusiasm to support them; the minutes of their last meeting note that the subscriptions are exhausted and resolve to call on the parish for more funds. The Independent Lambeth Cavalry were captained by John Astley, son of Philip Astley who founded the eponymous circus on Westminster Bridge Road.

    The Parish of Lambeth stretched South from the River Thames in London bordered by the parishes of Clapham and Streatham to the West, Croydon to the South and Christchurch, Southwark, Newington and Camberwell to the East.

    Lambeth 1899 

  • Sale!

    St. Mary, Islington, Volunteer Cavalry

    £7.50

    Loyal Volunteers of London

    With St. Mary’s Church to the South, the London Parish of Islington lies to the North of King’s Cross Railway Station and comprises Upper and Lower Holloway.  It is bounded on the West by the parish of St. Pancras, to the North by Hornsey, to the East by Stoke Newington and Hackney and to the South by St Luke’s, Clerkenwell and Shoreditch.

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