Rudolf Ackermann

Showing 1–16 of 25 results

  • St. James’s Volunteer

    £10.00

    St. James’s Volunteer – Stand at Ease

  • Royal Westminster Grenadiers

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London

    Westminster, a central area of London, became a city in 1539. For centuries Westminster and the City of London were geographically quite distinct. It was not until the sixteenth century that houses began to be built over the adjoining fields, eventually absorbing nearby villages such as Marylebone and Kensington, and gradually creating the vast Greater London that exists today. Westminster is bordered by the City of London to the East and, until 1965 by Marylebone and Paddington to the North (which were both then absorbed into Westminster) and by Kensington and Chelsea to the West. The River Thames forms the Southern border.

  • St. George’s Hanover Square

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London

    The Parish of St. George’s Hanover Square in London was formed following the decision by Parliament in 1711 to promote the erection of 50 new Churches within the Cities of London and Westminster. The Parish comprised what had previously been St Martin-in-the-Fields and stretched from Regent Street to the Serpentine, and south from Oxford Street to include Mayfair, Belgravia and Pimlico. The Church St George’s, Hanover Square, is an Anglican church in the City of Westminster, central London, built in the early eighteenth century as part of a project to build fifty new churches around London. The church was designed by John James, an apprentice of Sir Christopher Wren; its site was donated by General William Steuart, who laid the first stone in 1721.

  • Temple Bar and St. Paul’s (Later Loyal London Volunteers)

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London

    (The image below, from the Illustrated London News, is shown for historical interest and is not for sale)
    Temple Bar was the principal ceremonial entrance to the City of London from the City of Westminster. In the middle ages, London expanded city jurisdiction beyond its walls to gates, called ‘bars’, which were erected across thoroughfares. To the west of the City of London, the bar was located in the area known as the Temple. Temple Bar is situated on the historic royal ceremonial route from the Tower of London to the Palace of Westminster, the two chief residences of the medieval English monarchs, and from the Palace of Westminster to St Paul’s Cathedral. The road east of Temple Bar and within the City is Fleet Street, while the road to the west, in Westminster, is The Strand.

    Temple Bar Gate in 1870. The Illustrated London News.
  • Temple Association

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    As well as contributing towards the defence of the nation as a whole, members of the Temples formulated a plan for the defence of London in the eventuality of invasion by the French. A meeting was held on 7 April 1798 nearby at George’s Coffee House, and a committee of seven was appointed. This committee oversaw the creation of a plan to form a defence association, chaired by the Inner Temple Treasurer, Sir Robert Graham, to serve in a military capacity at their own expense. This plan was laid by Graham before King George III, who commanded him ‘to express to the committee the satisfaction which His Majesty has received from this proof of the zeal and loyalty of the members and inhabitants of the Inner and Middle Temples’. The association became known as The Temple Association Volunteers and fielded three companies, about three hundred men. It was active until 1802, when it was combined with the Lincoln’s Inn Association to form the Law Association Volunteers (1803-1808), which was granted the nickname ‘The Devil’s Own’.  Grateful acknowledgement to The Masters of the Bench of the Honourable Society of the Middle Temple –  Middle Temple Archive and History © The Honourable Society of Middle Temple [2022]

  • Hans Town Association

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    Hans Town is an area of West London in Chelsea and Kensington approximately surrounding Sloane Square that was owned by Sir Hans Sloane (1660-1753).  Sloane was an Anglo-Irish physician, naturalist, and collector who provided the foundation of the British Museum, the British Library, and the Natural History Museum, London. He was elected to the Royal Society at the age of 24 and later succeeded Sir Isaac Newton as its President.  Sloane travelled to the Caribbean in 1687 and documented his travels and findings with extensive publications years later. He was a renowned medical doctor among the aristocracy, and was elected to the Royal College of Physicians at age 27. 

  • The Honourable Artillery Company of London

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London

  • Pimlico Volunteer Association

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    Pimlico is an area of West London on the North side of the River Thames lying between Westminster and Chelsea. It is an upscale residential area with quiet streets lined with 19th-century homes. Its many hotels, plus proximity to Tate Britain, Chelsea and the Houses of Parliament make it popular.

  • East India Company

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    The East India Company was an English joint-stock company founded in 1600  formed to trade in the Indian Ocean region. The company seized control of large parts of the Indian subcontinent, colonised parts of Southeast Asia and Hong Kong after the First Opium War, and maintained trading posts and colonies in the Persian Gulf Residencies. It was headquartered in a large imposing building in Leadenhall Street in the heart of the City of London. The company rose to account for half of the world’s trade during the mid-1700s and early 1800s,] particularly in basic commodities including cotton, silk, indigo dye, sugar, salt, spices, saltpetre, tea, and opium. The company eventually came to rule large areas of India, exercising military power and assuming administrative functions.   There were both London based employees and retirees from India and the other outposts of the Company who had returned to England who provided the manpower for this Volunteer Association. Given that the Company had its own Army and Navy there would have been no shortage of suitable trained soldiers to join the ranks of the Volunteers.

  • Fulham Association

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London

    Fulham was a parish in the west of London lying in the bend of the River Thames between Chelsea to the East and Hammersmith to the North. Today it comprises the southern part of the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham.

  • St. Andrew Holborn & St. George the Martyr

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London

    St Andrew Holborn was an ancient English parish that until 1767 was partly in the City of London and mainly in the county of Middlesex. Its City (Southern) part retained its former name or sometimes  referred to as St Andrew Holborn Below the Bars.  From the old Thavie’s Inn,  Holborn embraced the legal worlds of Lincoln’s Inn and Grey’s Inn and stretched to  St. Giles in the Fields to the West. The Church of St. Andrew in Holborn was rebuilt to Wren’s design in 1686.

    St George the Martyr (and thus the working centre of the old Parish) is a church in the historic Borough district of south London. It lies within the modern-day London Borough of Southwark, on Borough High Street at the junction with Long Lane, Marshalsea Road, and Tabard Street. St George the Martyr is named after Saint George. Wikipedia

    Out of stock

  • St. George’s Hanover Square Armed Association

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    St George’s, Hanover Square, is an Anglican church (and thus epicentre of the old parish) in the City of Westminster, central London, built in the early eighteenth century as part of a project to build fifty new churches around London (the Queen Anne Churches). The church was designed by John James; its site was donated by General William Steuart, who laid the first stone in 1721. The building is one small block south of Hanover Square, near Oxford Circus. Because of its location, it has frequently been the venue for society weddings.

  • Royal Westminster Grenadiers

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London

  • Highland Armed Association

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    The first Scottish volunteer forces were formed during the invasion panics of the Napoleonic era.  The Highland Armed Association (renamed the Royal Highland Volunteers), formed in 1797, were shortly proceeded by the formation in 1803 of the Loyal North Britons and it is in 1803 that the first ever documented evidence of pipes and drums playing together on the march is found.  This marks the very birth of pipe band history.

  • The Armed Association of St. Mary, Whitechapel

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    For more than 600 years a Christian church stood on the site of Adler Street, White Church Lane and Whitechapel High Street in the East end of London. The Whitechapel Church, St Mary Matfelon was the second oldest in Stepney. In 1673, the parish of Stepney was divided into nine parishes, one of them being the newly formed parish of St Mary’s, Whitechapel. A third church was built on the site in the 19th century and opened and re-consecrated in 1877.  In 1880, the new church, opened three years before, was devastated by fire which left only its tower, vestry and church rooms intact. It was rebuilt and opened again in 1882, with a capacity for 1600 worshippers. During The Blitz, on 29 December 1940, an enemy fire raid destroyed the church. It was left in disrepair until it was finally demolished in 1952.

  • Bank of England Volunteers

    £10.00

    Loyal Volunteers of London
    (The image below, the original of which hangs in The Bank of England Museum, is shown for historical interest and is not for sale)

    Presentation of the Colours to the Bank of England Volunteer Corps by the Lady of Samuel Thornton, Esq. Governor of the Bank of England on 2nd September 1799.  By Thomas Stothard (1755–1834) Bank of England Museum accession 0289. © Bank of England.

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