Officer, 9th Foot, 1790

£5.00

II Infantry Uniforms of the British Army 1790-1850

In stock

Description

Raised in 1685 as Henry Cornwall’s Regiment of Foot, in 1751, it was numbered like most other British Army regiments and named the 9th Regiment of Foot. Closely identified with the county of Norfolk from a very early date in 1881 they became the Norfolk Regiment, augmented to Royal Norfolk Regiment after the 1st World War. In 1964 they were amalgamated into the Royal Anglian Regiment and is today one of the four regiments of the Queen’s Division. The badge of Britannia on the officer’s belt-plate was granted in 1707 in recognition of the gallant conduct of the regiment at Almanza. It was said that they alone were worthy to defend the honour of Britannia. During the Peninsular War the Spaniards thought the figure was that of the Virgin Mary and accorded the regiment a veneration which was a source of amusement to the other regiments earning them the nickname ‘˜The Holy Boys’. They provided the burial party for Sir John Moore at Corunna. The officers had a double line of black incorporated in the gold lace of their full-dress coats to commemorate this event. This type of dress is common in the British infantry at the outbreak of the Napoleonic Wars: simple and practical, and like civilian clothes of the time. The lapels of the facing colour (yellow here) are shown buttoned back, as on parade. They could be buttoned across the chest in bad weather or on informal occasions as many portraits show. The under-sides of button-holes on the left (invisible here) were often embroidered with regimental lace to make a show when the coat was so worn.

Additional information

Dimensions24 × 37.5 cm